Tag Archives: 特寫台灣EN

O’ Formosa

Taiwan Quinoa / Djulis

2020-03

Taiwan Quinoa / Djulis

©Shutterstock/glen photo

©Shutterstock/glen photo

Text|Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

Once considered exotic, Taiwan Quinoa is in fact a native species familiar to indigenous people in Taiwan for centuries. Known as "djulis" in Paiwan, "mukun" in Bunun, this brightly colored red and yellow quinoa grows well in dry, barren soil, making it suitable for hard times, and it is considered as nutritious as quinoa from South America.

Taiwan Quinoa / Djulis
Binomial name:Chenopodium formosanum

Taiwan Rosefinch

2020-02

Taiwan Rosefinch

©簡國祥

©簡國祥

Text|Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

The Taiwan Rosefinch, once considered a subspecies of the Vinaceous Rosefinch, is only found in nature in Taiwan. The male has striking red wine colored feathers, while the female has a simple brown appearance. These birds can be spotted in mountain ranges at about 2,000~3,000 meters. There they feed mainly upon seeds and small worms .

Taiwan Rosefinch
Binomial name:Carpodacus formosanus

Formosan Sambar

2020-01

Formosan Sambar

©莊竣程

©莊竣程

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

Formosan Sambars are Taiwan's largest herbivores, with a head and body length approximating 180 cm. They are also known as “four-eyed deer” because of their suborbital glands, which are situated just below their eyes. They rub the glands on tree trunks to mark their domain and open them when they are excited.

Fromosan Sambar
Binomial name:Rusa unicolor swinhoii
Family: Cervida Rusa

Taiwania

2019-12

Taiwania

©Snow Ram

©Snow Ram

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

This tree is the only plant that uses "Taiwan" as its genus in the kingdom of plants. It can grow to about 40 to 50 meters high and even higher. Because it is hard to see the canopy clearly from the ground, the Rukai people call it "the tree that hits the moon".

Taiwania
Binomial name:Taiwania cryptomerioides Hayata
Family: Taxodiaceae Taiwania

Taiwanese Fiddler Crab

2019-11

Taiwanese Fiddler Crab

©Tung Hsin Su

©Tung Hsin Su

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

Unlike most of their relatives, Taiwanese fiddler crabs dwell in viscid sandy habitats. They can easily be found in the wetlands of Xiangshan, Hsinchu.
Male crabs have an enlarged fiddler claw that resembles a pair of white scissors. This characteristic distinguishes them from other species in the area.

Taiwanese Fiddler Crab
Binomial name:Xeruca formosensis
Family: Ocypodidae

Formosan Serow

2019-10

Formosan Serow

©Alex Huang

©Alex Huang

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

The Formosan serow, also known as the Taiwan serow, is Taiwan's only known native bovid. It is widely distributed throughout the island's mountainous regions.
This species is adapted to steep and rugged terrain, where its special hoofs enable it to move freely about rocky slopes and cliffs.

Formosan Serow
Binomial name:Capricornis swinhoei
Family: Bovidae

Yushan Barberry

2019-09

Yushan Barberry

©莊信賢

©莊信賢

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

Named after Yushan where it was first discovered, the Yushan Barberry mostly grows at high-altitude mountain areas of the Central Mountain Range. In late spring and early summer, mountain hikers may find bright yellow flowers blooming on this shrub and glossy red berries during autumn. Be careful while approaching it, it has thorns to protect itself.

In late spring and early summer, mountain hikers may find bright yellow flowers blooming on this shrub and glossy red berries during autumn. Be careful while approaching it, it has thorns to protect itself.

Yushan Barberry
Binomial name:Gentiana arisanensis Hayata
Family: Gentianaceae 

Taiwan Firecrest

2019-08

Taiwan Firecrest

©Stephen Yang

©Stephen Yang

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

The Taiwan Firecrest, which has an average size of 9 cm in length and 7 grams in weight, is the tiniest of Taiwan's endemic birds. Its name comes from its most distinguishing feature, a flame-like orange-yellow crest that stands on top of a male bird's head when it gets excited.

Taiwan Firecrest
Binomial name: Regulus goodfellowi
Family: Regulidae 

Alishan Gentian

2019-07

Alishan Gentian

©莊信賢

©莊信賢

Text |Cynthia LaiConsultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

Alishan Gentian is an alpine plant you may encounter during a hike in the mountains of Taiwan's Central Range. The plant, which sprouts from the rocks of scree-covered slopes, can be recognized by its trumpet-shaped blossoms of various colors, usually deep blue or azure, but sometimes purple or violet.

Alishan Gentian
Binomial name:Gentiana arisanensis Hayata
Family: Gentianaceae 

Collared Bush Robin

2019-06

Collared Bush Robin

©鍾文傑

©鍾文傑

Consultant|Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute

These birds are endemic to the subalpine forest zone in Taiwan. They are active and frequently spotted near forest edges and along the mountain roadsides and parks. The adult male is brightly colored, while the female is a duller olive brown. Their breeding season begins in April and lasts until July.

©陳文

©陳文

Collared Bush Robin
Binomial name:Tarsiger johnstoniae
Family: Muscicapidae