Tag Archives: 小點心大世界EN

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Gua Bao

2019-09

Gua Bao

Text|Wei-Lin Lee・Illustrate|Wanyun

The meat-filled Taiwanese traditional snack, gua bao is also called “hu ya ju” (tiger bites pig) because it looks like the jaw of a tiger biting a piece of pork. The Taiwanese eat gua bao at the end of the year to signify eating up all the misfortunes from the past year and leaving a clean plate for good things to come.

Gû-lı̍k (Taiwanese Ladyfinger)

2019-08

Gû-lı̍k (Taiwanese Ladyfinger)

Text|Roger Kuo・Illustrate|Bebo

The name of the pastry Gû-lı̍k was transliterated into Taiwanese from the last word of the French pastry on which it is based, the “biscuit à la cuillère,” during the Japanese ruling period. Gû-lı̍k have a taste and texture reminiscent of their European predecessor. They can be discovered sitting on shelves of Taiwanese style pastry vendors.

Aiyu Jelly

2019-07

Aiyu Jelly

Text|Roger Kuo・Illustrate|Wanyun Chen

Aiyu jelly is a traditional summertime dessert loved by the Taiwanese. The jelly is made from a yellowish transparent gel found in jelly fig seeds and usually served with honey-sweetened iced lemonade in a bowl or cup. It is a refreshing thirst-quenching remedy for a hot summer day.

Taiwanese Oyster Fritter

2019-06

Taiwanese Oyster Fritter

Text|Wei-Lin Lee・Illustrate|Bebo

The Taiwanese oyster fritter is a local street food delicacy easily found in the coastal cities and towns of western Taiwan. Several oysters are deep fried in a batter containing various chopped vegetables such as cabbage, carrots, Chinese chives, and spring onions. Top a fritter with some chili sauce, and it will wow your taste-buds!

Wheel Pie

2019-05

Wheel Pie

Text|Wei-Lin Lee Illustrate|Wanyun

Originating from the Japanese snack, imagawayaki, the Taiwanese wheel pie is one of the commonly found street snacks.  It is often stuffed with either a sweet or savory filling and served freshly baked. The most frequently seen fillings are red bean paste, custard, pickled radish, sweet taro paste, or cheese.